Friday, June 27, 2014

SSP (Sugar Snap Peas -- the best, Jerry, the best!)

News from the Farm:  Sugar Snap Peas are Ready

The first "Pick-Your-Own" for CSA members will be this Saturday, June 28 from 10 am to noon.  The location of the Pick-Your-Own farm is:  397 Big Island Road, Florida, NY  10921.  There is red barn with a green roof and doors and a small blue storage shed next to the barn. 

Just a few things:

  • Make sure you wear old shoes.  (Once worn in the black dirt, they'll never be the same!)
  • There are no bathroom facilities on the farm.
  • Everyone should be careful where they walk to avoid falling in the irrigation ditches and groundhog holes (the weeds hide them well!)
  • Call 845-216-1282 in case you get lost! (Although cell service is spotty on the farm).
This year we are working with Dan & Monique Russo and their son Milo.  They live in New York City; Dan works for the Walking Dead (no kidding!), Monique is a classically-trained pianist and Milo, at age 4 is showing great potential for a career in golf.  After being members of a CSA for several years they thought, why not grow our own?  So, we're working together to grow pick-you-own vegetables for our CSA members. 

If you can't make it this Saturday, we plan to have another day next weekend (we're waiting to check the weather forecast) and more during the season once other vegetables are ready.

So, grab your hats, buckle in your kids and take a ride to the Black Dirt Region! 

Here's a few other things to enjoy while in the Warwick area:

  • Quaker Creek   Gourmet Meats & Products -- It's just around the corner from the farm and serves great lunches.  Or pick up some freshly prepared chicken sausages for the grill!  The sweet potato and German potato salads are excellent!  It's our favorite restaurant in the area!
  • The Eclectic Eye   Antique Store in downtown Warwick (nearby are some really good restaurants:  Fetch, Noble Pies, Yesterdays, LaPetite Cuisine and the Pioneer)
  • Bellvale Farms Creamery  Ice Cream -- It's worth the trip just for the view!  And it's right next to an awesome part of the Appalachian Trail with a hawk watch.
  • Lowland Farm  Our grass-fed meat partner is open on Saturdays (the kids will enjoy seeing the farm animals).
  • Pacem in Terris   A trans-religious sanctuary. (Grange, a great farm-to-table restaurant that serves meat from Lowland Farm is close by)

Hope to see you Saturday!

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Bumpin' Crop...of Strawberries

Bumping Across Life

Did you notice that the days are getting shorter?  Me neither.  But they are.  I can't see it yet but I can feel it.  And so can the weeds.  All I can say is whew!  We've crossed the vegetable rubicon! The last few weeks have been intense.  But now all is well.  "I think we're going to have a really good year," I said to my husband.  "Barring any unforeseen circumstances" (such as injuries, crop failures (there will always be some but we can absorb it -- that's the good thing about not monocroppong) or death, you just never know! 

Last night I woke up during the night only to see the yard filled with lightening bugs (a Midwestern term, they're called "Fireflies" on the East Coast. Soda vs. pop.  Everything is much more fancy out here).  I was just wondering yesterday when they would appear and remembering the time we camped out in  the backyard with our kids and the tent was bright all night from the "fireflies."  And it struck me, hard.  The years are moving along so quickly, too quickly, especially with the farm. 

How many more times in my lifetime will I hear the first of the spring peepers?  Or see the first lightening bug?  Or eat the wild dandelion greens? Or grate the horseradish?  Or chop the garlic scapes for my omelet?  I'm 56.  If I live to be 86, just 30 more times.  Not enough.  I need to catch up and not always be behind trying to catch up.  I just want to have those few moments of every moment where the moment is all there is. Hear that spring peeper sing so loudly it's always ringing in my ears.  See that bright light from the lightening bug so that my mind is always bright.  Eat those bitter wild dandelion greens and make wine for the winter from the flowers to remember the first of spring. And still hear the spring peepers. And see the light.

People will sometimes ask me what I eat (Vegan, vegetarian, low-carb, Paleo, Ornish, Atkins, Zone, Mediterranean, SAD (Standard American Diet) all I can think of is, what's in the bag this week? Again?  And what can I possibly preserve for the long winter ahead?  Seasonally, I guess, would be the answer.  What I can grow?  And what can I get locally.  Because I can't do it alone.  I'm so glad that there are people around who actually like to raise beef.  And pork.  And fruit.  And bees.  And mushrooms.  And chickens.  And eggs.  And maple syrup. And buckwheat.  And spelt.  It's exhausting to think of doing all these things alone.  (I once tried, very unsuccessfully, to do many of these things.  I can still hear the cries of the chickens from a not-so friendly visit from the neighbor's dog).  It's beyond Community Supported Agriculture.  It's just life. And still a little bumpy.

Bumper Crops
Dan was right!  It is a year of bumper crop strawberries. More strawberries this week! Yum...

Mo'Pweeze Bakery
"Home of the Delectable and Divine Allgery-Free Cupcakes
Always Dairy, Egg, Nut, Gluten/Wheat, Soy Free"

Chris has turned a problem (allergic kids!) into a solution for her and others.  She will be at the CSA this week in Hawthorne with her healthy and delicious allergy-free cupcakes! 

Enjoy! 

P.S.  I cooked up some of the chicory tonight for dinner.  It was really delicious and not a bit bitter. (Although I happen to like bitter, it took me some time to acquire a taste for bitter.  If you're trying to get someone who doesn't like bitter greens (think husband  -- no offense to those men who cook! and love bitter greens! and/or kids) to eat them, add a bit of sautéed chopped apple or a tablespoon of raisins soaked in 1/4 cup of hot water).  Just a bite of bitter is better and more potent than a pill or "supplement."  (I never could get that concept. Supplement.  Why supplement when you can get the real thing?  Vegetables.  Especially greens.  Leafy greens. Bitter greens.  Local greens. Sweet greens. Juiced greens.  Just greens.  Always greens. Every day!) 

 
Vegetable List

lettuce (red leaf)
lettuce (Boston)
chicory
spinach
cilantro
kale (one of my favorite things!)
radishes
parsley
tomatoes
green garlic and/or garlic scapes


Recipes

The Crisper Whisperer (7 great scape recipe ideas!)
Pickled Garlic Scapes
Wow!  Even Smithsonian is talking garlic scapes!

It's okay to be bitter (chicory, here I come!)
Chicory & White Bean Soup
Chicory & Orange Salad with Ginger Dressing
Six Tips for Flawless Kale Chips  
Creamy Curried Kale & Chickpeas
Cilantro, it's one of those herbs you love or hate!, 22 ways

My very favorite cilantro recipe -- I eat it by the spoonful!

1 c. cashews (or walnuts, almonds or pecans) toasted lightly
6 T. of cilantro
1/4 c. olive oil
2 T. soy sauce (I use gluten-free tamari)
2 t. brown sugar
1 jalapeno pepper (optional -- some like it hot!)
1 T. lime juice (and zest is always good)
salt to taste

Blend all in a food processor.  Stores well in the refrigerator.

Enjoy!

 


 

Hoe, Hoe, Hoe, Mary Vegetables

Hoes & Hoes
We spent three hours on the "pick-your-own" farm hoeing. Ho, Ho, Hoeing. Three smart women.  Starting at 7 am.. (Jenny wanted to start at 6 am.  Monique, 11 am.  Me, a middle child, always the accommodator, in between, how about 7? Monique, Jenny and me. Again, three women.  Smart. At least we think we are.  We do have a lot in common.  Vegetables.  Vegetables.  Lots of vegetables. 

And Black Dirt. Black. Black. Dirt. We all could be doing something else, something more productive, at least monetarily with our skill sets, and yet here we are.  Three determined women from China, the Ukraine and Illinois (I'm the most unromantic in this gig! being from Illinois and all) in the dirt.  Black dirt.  Hoeing.  And hoeing.  And hoeing.  But this is just so important!
And that's why we're here.  All of us.  It's no coincidence (in a population of 8.5 million people and here we are...250!).  We get it. (And you do too.  Or else you wouldn't be here. In this CSA).  And some years you do get it and some years you don't. It doesn't matter.  Honestly. Our heels are dug in. To the Black Dirt.  (But you are always welcome to return to the fold.  Our prodigal suns. Even if it all turns to sh**). We are here for you. Doing what we do.  Growing vegetables.  

And hoeing.  Because that is what smart women do. Hoe. It's not pretty. And maybe it's not smart. But this is what we do.  Hoe. A row. Smart. Women. We are. 

Friday, June 20, 2014

Ah, yes, this is why...

Lisa Reminder: Ah, yes.  This is why you (I) do it!  
"Hi,
I just want to let you know how amazed I am at the amount of vegetables I am getting.  It is amazing! I love that I have to figure out how to use it all.  The dill smells amazing! I have never had better strawberries in my life.
I'm also having some difficulty because I'm not sure what everything is.  How exactly could I use that purple corn? I googled and saw a purple drink. Any suggestions?
Did I get collard greens or is that lettuce?  I know some is lettuce.. It feels great to learn more about what we could grow so close to home.

Thanks,
J"

 
"Hi,
I must admit I am not one to email, I just enjoy all of your veggies and tell everyone I know about you. But this week I need to email to say thank you! 
I've been very ill the past few months and was not allowed any fresh veggies. I am on the mend and when I picked up our share last week I was in Heaven.
I roasted the beets, onions and radishes. Our share included a cabbage instead of broccoli rabe, so after a quick Google search I made veggie stuffed cabbage. My husband loves horseradish; me - I thought it only came in a jar :)  Following your recipe I made fresh horseradish (cleaned my sinuses in the process) and made horseradish encrusted salmon with roasted veggies for dinner.
I have not eaten a salad since late February and I have to say the 3 of us could not get enough of the lettuce, spinach and arugula! It was delicious! 
I am so looking forward to everything else this season!

THANK YOU for all that you do! It is truly appreciated!

 M."


Sometimes, oftentimes, life comes so fast and furious that it's hard to take those few moments out of the day and really enjoy them. And there are three weeks in particular that I find really intense.  From May 15 (or whenever the last frost should be) to June 21 (make that 5 weeks, it just feels like 3).  It's the start of the CSA, the time to transplant all the sensitive plants (think of your eldest child (they're all a lot of work!) or (even-especially! )tomato, pepper, tomatillo & eggplant plants, fussy, fussy, fussy!), the beginning the fruit share (fruit is a whole other ball of wax (I now know why most fruit is waxed! Transportation. And shelf life).  

I happened to go into a Stop & Shop to buy a case of bottled water (Poland Spring -- to freeze for CSA drop-offs. It's cheaper than ice packs!) and I wandered through the produce aisles.  And I was immediately depressed.  They had containers of strawberries (CA-grown), raspberries (they looked so perfect I almost bought some!), blackberries (not so good looking), blueberries (from Florida and Georgia), mangos (not sure where they were from!) And I just wanted to throw in the towel. What's the point?  We can't compete!  Against corporate agriculture.

And then, I received these emails.  And they touched my heart.  And remind me of me and why I did this crazy thing (farming vegetables) in the first place. Ah, yes.  This is why I (you) do it. Because it is amazing. The vegetables.  The fruit.  The dill.  You and me.  Our  community.  Of supported agriculture. And popcorn.  Isn't that just the most amazing vegetable of all?  It's blue and will last for ten years. I love it! But,

I don't want to be blue and last forever. I want to be now! Arugula. Spinach.  Lettuce.  Strawberries.  I just wasn't to enjoy. The ever present.


Enjoy! I am.The Everpresent. Enjoying.  (It's not a word.  It's an experience).

Thank you!

Lisa

Fruit & Veggies...and Blue Popcorn!

Above photo is of an antique corn sheller.  We have one at the CSA in Hawthorne.  And for a machine that is very low tech (no touch screens, batteries or engines!) it still works great. In just one turn of the wheel, it strips all the popcorn off the cob.   But, it is a little dangerous.  It would never pass today's safety regulations!

News from the Farm:  CSA Reminder: Fruit & Veggies, Veggies & Fruit


Rinse, Repeat. But Please Join us. And support another farmer!

Dan just called and he said he has a "bumper crop" of strawberries (which are late this year!) Do we want to start the fruit share early?  Yes, yes, yes!!! (How can anyone say no to strawberries!) 

By the way, this is the first time we've gotten strawberries from Dan because in past years the strawberries would be ripe before the first CSA pickup.  But if there's anything I've learned from farming these past seven years, it's the absolute necessity of being flexible. (If you're a bit of a control-freak (like me) and want to soften some of those edges, take up farming!)  As much as we plan out the season (and we do...in December), order the seeds and plants, schedule the sowing of seeds and transplants, sign up members before the season begins, weed and thin seedlings according to the waxing and waning moon, or plan a nice barbeque for Father's Day, Nature always wears the colors of the spirit.  So, rather than laboring under calamity, we flexibly labor under the Honey Moon and rejoice that we are able to partake in the first local strawberry!

And so, the first fruit share will be this Wednesday, June 18.  We still have fruit shares available.  Please let us know if you'd like to join and you, too, can enjoy the first fruit of the season!

Lowland Farm Grass-Fed Meat 
Anyone may purchase grass-fed beef and pastured pork directly through Lowland Farm.  You may now place your order directly online. We will have your order bagged and ready to go in the freezer. (It's so worth the little extra cost to buy really good meat! Especially if you're looking to live a really long time and be among those who eat 7 times more vegetables than meat -- but it must be good meat!) AKA no pink slime!  Or pumped with GMO grains. Cows like to graze. Peacefully.  And so do I!

Honey & Eggs & Grass-Fed Butter
There are also local honey, eggs  and grass-fed butter available to purchase. (The butter is just in time for the popcorn or is the popcorn just in time for the butter?) There weren't too many honey takers last week.  But it's so important.  Supporting these local beekeepers. If it weren't for them and bees, we'd all be screwed.  Just six inches of topsoil, just 9 meals from revolution! 

MoGreen Juice

Did you know MoGreen Juice has now added two new kids juices?  You'll probably love them as well, so give a try to Maureen's new Orange/Pineapple/Carrot/Pear or Spinach/Apple/Lemon/Mint. (Actually, these kids juices are deliciously transformed into "adult" drinks by adding a little gin (or vodka) and seltzer!)

Homespun Chili
Homespun Chili makes great artisan chili, including John's famously popular Buffalo chicken chili- Cockadoodle Blue. Homespun Chili is a nutritious quick meal anytime, but especially when you are running late.(Spend all day on the internet and just 12 minutes in the microwave, add a few leaves of our lettuce for a salad and voila, a home cooked meal! Who said we women don't have secrets?)  We are now stocking a limited supply and taking orders for more!  Banzo Masala is my favorite!

Fruit Share 
We are taking applications for this year's fruit share.  More information about the Dan, our Fruit Man and his orchard and sign-up form can be found on our website www.hesperidesorganica.com under CSA -- Fruit List.  We will also leave fruit share sign-up forms at each of the locations. 

The number of shares is limited (in fact, we have 12 shares left!)  

P.S.  We just made a batch of  popcorn with the blue corn -- and it doesn't look so great on the cob, but in the words of my son, "(Golly, gee -- me, not him) This popcorn tastes great!"  and my other son, "Popcorn sure is a great vehicle for eating this butter!"

Enjoy! I do!

 

Thank you for joining us this season!  
 
 

First Fruit! Strawberries...

"You can't put a price on fruit that has not been dipped in wax or frozen in nitrogen (or handpicked!)" ~ Veronica -- Fifth-year CSA member
 
News from the Farm:  First Fruit!  Strawberries...

Dan just called and he said he has a "bumper crop" of strawberries (which are late this year!) Do we want to start the fruit share early?  Yes, yes, yes!!! (How can anyone say no to strawberries!) 

By the way, this is the first time we've gotten strawberries from Dan because in past years the strawberries would be ripe before the first CSA pickup.  But if there's anything I've learned from farming these past seven years, it's the absolute necessity of being flexible. (If you're a bit of a control-freak (like me) and want to soften some of those edges, take up farming!)  As much as we plan out the season (and we do...in December), order the seeds and plants, schedule the sowing of seeds and transplants, sign up members before the season begins, weed and thin seedlings according to the waxing and waning moon, or plan a nice barbeque for Father's Day, Nature always wears the colors of the spirit.  So, rather than laboring under calamity, we flexibly labor under the Honey Moon and rejoice that we are able to partake in the first local strawberry!

And so, the first fruit share will be this Wednesday, June 18.  We still have fruit shares available.  Please let us know if you'd like to join and you, too, can enjoy the first fruit of the season!

P.S.  Another email will be sent this evening with a list of vegetables for this week.  We're still picking!

Lowland Farm Grass-Fed Meat
Anyone may purchase grass-fed beef and pastured pork directly through Lowland Farm.  You may now place your order directly online. We will have your order bagged and ready to go in the freezer. 

Honey & Eggs & Grass-Fed Butter
There are also local honey, eggs  and grass-fed butter available to purchase. 

Fruit Share 
We are taking applications for this year's fruit share.  More information about the Dan, our Fruit Man and his orchard and sign-up form can be found on our website www.hesperidesorganica.com under CSA -- Fruit List.  We will also leave fruit share sign-up forms at each of the locations.  The number of shares is limited and we have sold out in past years.  The first scheduled fruit share delivery is July 2.

 

Thank you for joining us this season!  

First CSA Pickup -- Wednesday, June 11

News from the Farm:  First CSA Pickup -- Wednesday, June 11

The first pickup for the 2014 Season is Wednesday, June 11

Details for the specific locations:

Hawthorne -- 27 Utter Avenue  Hours:  2-7 pm
     There will be a sign that says "Farm Fresh Produce" in the empty lot near the entrance.  There will be a sign-in sheet for members to check their names off.  Member shares are located in the walk-in cooler.  Each black plastic crate is one share.  Members are encouraged to bring a bag to transfer the vegetables to. (We also provide plastic bags to put the vegetables in). 
Shared Shares
     For members splitting shares, the first person arriving can divide the share and place the other share on a table for "Shared Shares" with their partners name on.
Lowland Farm Grass-Fed Meat
   
Anyone may purchase grass-fed beef and pastured pork directly through Lowland Farm.  You may now place your order directly online. We will have your order bagged and ready to go in the freezer. 
Honey & Eggs
     There are also local honey and eggs available to purchase. The price of the eggs is $6 per dozen for pastured, certified organic & kosher eggs and $4 per dozen for farm-fresh brown eggs.  The honey is locally produced by my neighbor and is $6 per 1 lb. jar and $12 per 2 lb. jar.  

For the other pickup locations, the shares will be in plastic bags inside a green canvas bag  or soft-sided cooler (for outdoor locations).  Please ONLY take the plastic bags and leave the green canvas bag or soft-sided cooler behind!!!  Shares must be picked up on Wednesday because there is no overnight refrigeration available! 

Hackensack -- 685 Main Street (Tarts & Flours Bakery) 10am - 6pm

New Milford -- 685 Princeton Street 1-8pm


Pelham, NY -- 451 Esplanade (Pelham Jewish Center) 4:30-6:30pm

Ramsey -- 70 E. Main Street (Baked in a Cup) 1-6pm

Ringwood -- 16 Skyline Lakes Drive (All-State Insurance) 1-6pm

Union City -- 562 Hudson Avenue Weehawken, NJ  07086 (Please note:  St. John's Church is undergoing renovations and this will be the location for the 2014 Season).

   
Fruit Share 
We are taking applications for this year's fruit share.  More information about the Dan, our Fruit Man and his orchard and sign-up form can be found on our website www.hesperidesorganica.com under CSA -- Fruit List.  We will also leave fruit share sign-up forms at each of the locations.  The number of shares is limited and we have sold out in past years.  The first scheduled fruit share delivery is July 2.

 

Thank you for joining us this season!  

Monday, June 9, 2014

Well Begun is Half Done

Well Begun is Half Done
And so it is.  Well, begun.  And almost half done.  June 21.  The summer solstice. Half done but barely begun. Let me explain.

There are three really crazy (and critical) weeks of farming.  (At least in the North East).  From the last frost (did you even know, or care, that there are two different types of frost, advective and radiation?) usually around May 15 through the first week of June.  This is when all the tomato, pepper, tomatillo, eggplant and herb transplants need to be planted (by hand) along with planting the seeds for vegetables best grown from seed:  zucchini, cucumbers, sweet corn, popcorn and my favorite, winter squash (Anna Swartz, Thelma Sanders, Waltham Butternut, PA Dutch Crookneck, Spaghetti, Long Island Cheese, Tuffy Acorn Squash and Blue Hubbard, the old tried and true squash that lasts until the rest give up and serves as a "trap crop" (Mother anyone?) to catch the evil-doers, bugs, I mean. 

Of course, the "pumpkin planter" (it's actually a MX-12) that we had lent to someone last year was, unbeknownst to us, returned damaged. (Equipment failures and repairs are a big part of farming.  If you're not handy, buy a farm.  In one year you will either become handy or will be without a farm) So, we overnighted parts from Market Farm and Albert spent the day rebuilding the planter -- just in time to plant sweet corn and popcorn.  And this is the easy part. 

Meanwhile, we weed. And weed (cultivate is the correct term, but you know what I mean). The weed pressure in the Black Dirt is Intense.  (Yes, that's a capital eye).  Like everything, it's a double-edged sword. The Black Dirt is so fertile and so easy to grow on (all you have to do is drop a seed and bingo, it sprouts!)  I like to call it "Farming for Dummies."  But that also means that every little weed seed (and there are millions of them, literally) love to sprout in the Black Dirt. And they look so small and innocent.  Just a few leaves. And roots. But man, those roots are strong.  One time I pulled a little weed, just two-three inches. And the root was 15 inches long. Intact.  I was so impressed that I pressed that weed onto a piece of cardboard.  I like to show it off.  But I'm not sure many people really get it. How hard it really is.

Every row in the Black Dirt is weeded (and often planted) by hand at least once during the season.  And that includes even the mono-cropping onion fields. Just think of that.  As you drive by fields and fields and rows and rows of plants. Someone has been out there on their hands and knees pulling weeds. And planting.  Sometimes I'll drive by a field on my way to Shop Rite and see a team of people planting onion plants.  By the time I return, the field is green with plants. 


Well, I think, it's not only begun, it's half done.  And maybe, that's enough!



Fruit

Dan, the Fruit Man, Our Fruit Man, Is Back!
For another year.  You don't know what you have until it's gone.  Ain't that the truth?  Just last Monday I woke up with Vertigo (and that isn't my cat or my kid).  I've never had it before (well, maybe just once driving from New Jersey to Illinois) and it was a scary feeling.   What if I never recover from this?  Just the day before I felt fine.  But the next day I could barely walk.  What if this is a permanent condition?  But it's not.  None of it is.  It's all changing.  All the time.  Changing. Changing. Changing. Constantly changing.  But always the same. Scary.

And that is where the mystery (the scare) lies. 

And why we need to hold on to what we have.  At least recognize it.  And appreciate it. And so I have decided to redouble my efforts of gratitude.  And in looking over the list of the CSA members for this year, I am grateful and humbled by all those rejoin, sometimes year after year! And I really appreciate those who rejoin after being gone for a year or two or seven. (Have we really been doing at this so long?)  Shucks. Time flies.

And I am also humbled (and amazed and grateful) by those who don't really know us, but trust us, enough to send a check.  A vote of confidence.  In us. And the universe!  I would like to be so cosmic, but alas, I am not. I'm still trying to figure out the weeds. (Which ones can I eat again?)

All I know is Dan, the Fruit Man. Is back. Fruit. The perfect complement. Or is it compliment? To us. Vegetables. We missed him last year.  And I think he missed us. The CSA. (Health-wise, he's doing much better and looking forward to another year!) We changed our pick-up day to Wednesday this year, in large part to accommodate Dan and the fruit.  And I told him in no uncertain terms, "Don't worry!  We'll take whatever you have (and if we need to we will get some supplemental fruit from some other local orchards). We just appreciate you and your fruit!)

(Note:  The CSA is not for everyone -- including vegetable eaters and vegetable (and fruit) growers.  It's  what I like to call "faith-based agriculture."  Our members have faith in us that we will deliver Something, Anything, week after week. And we do, and have.  For seven years and counting!  (Although, I'm not. Counting. Each year is just one year closer to me being 94 and standing on that roof that my Black Dirt farmer-mentor did. At 94). And we (vegetable and fruit growers) have enough faith that enough people will sign up for all those plants we have planted! This year
-- more plants, less members. We would like to have more members and could certainly accommodate many more! But, if we don't, it just means we will give more vegetables away.  And we are no strangers to giving away lots and lots of vegetables.  We're here. Waiting for the world, and people, to catch up.  To good food). We're only looking for between 250-400 people in a population on 8.5 million. In the meantime, it's stressful. Our risks great. Our margins slim. Our expenses many.  And our knees sore (because someone has to do it!)  Plant those onion, tomato, pepper, herb, tomatillo plants and winter squash seeds.  And weed.  And weed. And weed.

So, if you know of anyone who would benefit in eating more vegetables every day (everyone?) or at least every week (every other one!), please refer them to us!  We deliver. The best vegetables. On earth.


Enjoy!
 

Join us...for some really great vegetables, really great fruit and a great season!


The 2014 CSA sign-up form is now posted on:
 
hesperidesorganica.com

The 2014 Fruit Share form is also posted on our website.  Look under:

CSA, Fruit List, Sign-Up Form.

The fruit shares are limited so please sign up early!